Brother International to spark trend for low-cost tailor shops

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One of the sewing machines used to embroider a design onto a piece of cloth. Image: Zaim Kasmat

This article was first published on November 23, 2018 on our weekly e-paper.

Waqiuddin Rajak
BANDAR SERI BEGAWAN

Global printing solutions provider Brother International wants to spark a trend for “low-cost tailor shops” by bringing in its digital sewing machines to Brunei.

The firm made this move after seeing its potential market in the country, especially with the sultanate now pushing for more startups to rise and become part of its economic diversification efforts.

Brother International (M) Senior Sales Account Manager V Kumara Rajah said in an interview that the digital sewing machines could help Bruneians set up tailor shops at a lower cost – and without having to worry much about spaces.

“This is because these sewing machines are designed to be compact and portable; people would not have to worry about finding space to place it as they can always bring them anywhere they want,” he said.

“They can bring them out if they prefer to work outdoors and they can definitely convert their homes to become tailor shops whenever they needed,” he added.

One of the machines displayed by Brother International’s local partner, Bilster Technologies. Image: Zaim Kasmat

He explained that the digital sewing machines are made to replace conventional machines that took more space in shops and has to be operated by workers.

“It is designed to help people to cut costs, should they want to delve in the tailoring business.  The machines are capable of finishing up sewing, embroidery and quilting projects with just one push to the button,” he said.

“All they need to do is to get a design, upload it to the machine and press the button to begin sewing the pattern – convenient for tailor shops that make army logos, school badges and other design-based accessories and fashion,”

“If they want to make their own designs however, they would need to get a specialised software from us which we can also provide for a price along with the sewing machines,” he added.

This however only applies to the heavier, industry-specified digital sewing machines that may cost at least around $10,000 or more, he explained.

“Otherwise, we also have sewing machines for hobbyists that came with pre-made designs, which cost about $1,000,” he said.

While the sewing machines could be new to Brunei, the manager said there are companies around the world had already begun using them to operate businesses.

“While startups could be our strong market, we still want to see what other applications we leverage on to strengthen our business here,” he said.

“We have recently secured a local partner, Bilster Technologies.  With their help, we hoped we can market these digital sewing machines better alongside our printing solutions here in Brunei,” he added.

The Bruneian